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Welcome to the Soifer Mathematical Olympiad

 

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You are invited to the 38th Soifer (formerly Colorado) Mathematical Olympiad, which will take place on Friday, October 7, 2022.
Please, arrive at 8 a.m. to the Berger Hall of the University of Colorado Colorado Springs campus. You will have up to 4 hours, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

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Requirements

  • The Soifer Mathematical Olympiad is free of charge. 
  • Colorado students (out of state: please write to Dr. Alexander Soifer to request permission).
  • Grades 5 through 12.
  • No School Performance Prerequisites.
  • Individual Competition (No Teams).
  • Participants may use a calculator but not the internet.
  • Recommend that participants bring a sack lunch and drinks. 

The Award Presentation Ceremonies will follow on Friday, October 14, 2022 in Berger Hall.
The start is at 2 p.m.

Have Questions? Contact:

Sam Frank
2022 Soifer Mathematical Olympiad Event Coordinator
(719) 255-4289
sfrank@uccs.edu

About the Soifer Mathematical Olympiad

Approximately 20,000 students have participated throughout the 37 years of the Colorado Mathematical Olympiad. They have written roughly 97,250 essays and were awarded over $440,000 in prizes. The Olympiad is a unique joint effort of school districts, schools, industry, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, and City and State governments.

What the best mathematicians are saying…

“I am almost speechless facing the ingenuity and inventiveness demonstrated in the problems proposed in the third decade of these Olympics. However, equally impressive is the drive and persistence of the originator and living soul of them. It is hard for me to imagine the enthusiasm and commitment needed to work singlehandedly on such and endeavor over several decades.”
– Branko Grünbaum, University of Washington

“…The Olympiad problems were very good from the beginning, but in the third decade the problems have become extraordinarily good. Every brace of 5 problems is a work of art. The harder individual problems range in quality from brilliant to work of genius…”
– Peter D. Johnson, Jr., Auburn University